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EDUCATION SECTOR

Overview

It is widely acknowledged that Pakistan’s education systems are in a state of crisis. Various efforts have not produced results, and the nation is at a crossroads. It is time to not only address our immediate needs, but also plan for education’s future. What does the changing world mean for education? How do we ensure provision of education to ALL our citizens? In an age where Information is already accessible at everyone’s fingertips, it is likely that we will have access to a level of content that we cannot conceive. We will all have to learn to differentiate between information and knowledge. Measuring the outcomes of education through assessment systems will also, of necessity require rethinking.

New Education Systems are being tasked with producing
the six “C”s:

  • Critical / Analytical Thinkers: As more and more information becomes available at the click of a button, the ability to analyse, connect unrelated areas, and apply technical information to complex problems will become increasingly important.
  •  Creative Thinkers: In the cut paste world, originality and creativity will become increasingly rare. It will be important for  education systems to nurture creativity, originality and the creation of new knowledge.
  •  Collaborators: Complex problems will require multidisciplinary, cross sectoral thinking and collaborative working  approaches. Teaching and learning styles need to change to embed this into the education system as early as possible
  •  Continual Learners: The requirements of increasingly practical, technical skills when entering the job market, increased demand for work/life balance by millennials, a rapidly aging workforce without those skills and longer life spans will all mean that learning will need to be a lifelong process
  •  Citizens of the World: An increasingly complex world will require global citizens who will be able to understand the “big picture” and establish the foundations for new governance structures as borders collapse and physical resources become increasingly scarce.
  •  Compassion /Tolerance/Peace Keepers:  The current violence in the world more than ever reflects the absolute need for compassion and peace to be embedded into all education systems.

Technology provides a unique opportunity for Pakistan to leapfrog its education system into the future. It can provide outreach to millions for problems such as literacy and numeracy, as well as provide an opportunity across all the systems to improve the QUALITY of learning.

KEY STATISTICS

s
50% OF SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN OUT OF
SCHOOL (25 MILLION CHILDREN)
ONLY 17% OF SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN
COMPLETE SECONDARY SCHOOL
s
476,850 TVET SEATS FOR 2,400,000
ANNUAL NEW LABOUR MARKET ENTRANTS
s
1.4 MILLION STUDENTS ENROLLED IN
HIGHER ED WITH LOW EMPLOYABILITY
RATES AND LITTLE APPLICATION OR
COMMERCIALIZATION OF RESEARCH.

CHALLENGES

Challenges in Higher Ed and TVET

    • Mapping and Forecast of National Labour Needs
    • Demand Led vs Supply Led
    • Focus on Applied Research

Challenges in Primary and Secondary:

  • Enrollment /Access
  • Retention
  • Quality

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Demand Side Capacity Building for labour forecasting
  • Online Content Development
  • Multiple Delivery Mechanisms (Schools, Cable TV,
    Internet, Mobile)
  • Changes in Assessment systems

Sources:

APEAM – Pakistan Education Statistics 2015-16.pdf

MIT Technology review- Mapping Higher Education, Khalid Khattak

Solutions From Around the World:

  • In Kenya, Bridge International Academies utilizes the “Academy in a Box” model, which emphasizes high-quality education through standardization, for its chain of 300 low-cost private schools. Bridge has developed scripted lesson plans and step-by-step instructions available on tablets; these allow less qualified or less experienced teachers to conduct lessons they may typically not be able to and reduce the time teachers spend on non-instructional activities.
  • Nafham is a free online education platform that hosts and produces video lessons covering Egyptian and Syrian curricula. In addition to original video content, Nafham encourages crowd-teaching among students with its monthly competitions for peer-education videos. With over 500,000 students served and 30 million views to its videos, Nafham demonstrates how strong students’ desire, especially in areas with many displaced children, is for a place to interact and learn with other boys and girls.

  • EduTrac, an innovative project from Uganda, is an open source application that monitors education service delivery and can be used to collect any type of numerical data via SMS. EduTrac provides districts in Uganda with a tool to facilitate tracking of accountability measures such as teacher attendance rates, and helps to improve education policies.

Source:

Database: Education Technology, Center for Education Innovations