Energy sector

ENERGY SECTOR

Overview

Historically, Pakistan has always been an energy importer and is highly dependent on fossil fuels. With the rising fossil fuel prices, the cost of oil importing is creating a dent on Pakistan’s foreign exchange reserves. The rising oil price along, with the rising demand for uninterrupted power, is creating additional pressure on the already fragile electricity grid of Pakistan.

Overall Pakistan is struggling with a large gap between electricity supply and a demand of about 5 GW. Main reasons for low investments in power generation are tariffs below cost recovery levels, power theft, insufficient collection rates, and technical losses of around 23-25%. As a result, power generation companies face serious financial problems, making large investments in power generation very difficult.

KEY STATISTICS

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POPULATION WITHOUT ELECTRICITY: 49,500,000
ELECTRIFICATION - TOTAL POPULATION: 73%
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ELECTRIFICATION - URBAN AREAS: 91%
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ELECTRIFICATION - RURAL AREAS: 62% (2013)

CHALLENGES

  • Integrated Energy Planning & Demand Forecasting
  • Imbalanced Energy Mix with heavy reliance on gas (47.5%) and Oil (30.5%) (72% imported)
  • Transmission, distribution loses/theft
  • Inadequate revenue collection by DISCOs

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Alternate sources of energy including solar, wind, biomass, biodiesel
  • Energy conservation and demand management programs
  • Ensure operational/financial integrity of the sector
  • Implement international best practices including smart metering / automated meter reading (AMR) systems and Time of Use (TOU) tariff

Source: https://energypedia.info/wiki/Pakistan_Energy_Situation

An Overview of Pakistan Energy Sector Report by Islamabad Chamber of Commerce & Industry (ICCI), The News

Solutions From Around the World:

The first step in making a reliable and responsive smart grid system requires the installation of Smart Meters in every household and building. The new meters will send usage information in real time to your energy provider, allowing adjustments in availability to fluctuate according to the area’s latest needs. Small communities have begun “microgrid" projects that will allow consumer demand to drive implementation.

Some researchers at UC Berkeley have come up with an idea for tapping into wave power that seems disarmingly simple. A seabed ‘carpet’ undulates in unison with waves, generates hydraulic pressure, which in turn is piped and turned into electricity. The potential of marine power – waves, tides and thermal gradients – is considerable; in this case it’s suggested that the ocean could provide for over half of America’s energy needs.

13 year-old Maanasa Mendu developed an ingenious energy device HARVEST that could cost just $5. HARVEST produces clean energy through ‘solar leaves’, which generate both power from the sun, and from vibrations, using piezoelectric materials. This makes it potentially suitable for all weather conditions, and for use by those around the world with no access to electricity.

  • Source:
    5 green energy innovations that could change the world, Zainab Calcuttawala, Business Insider, 10 May 2017

Five of the latest green energy innovations that have caught our eye, Gary Hartley, Energy Saving Trust, 20 April 2017